Angstadt 6 Block Double Weave

This is a scarf that I wove in double weave on my 24 shaft AVL loom 11 years ago. It was woven in burgundy and white cotton.

I hand knotted the fringes and beaded it. I believe that I gifted this it was not sold. If you have it please send me a photo of you with it.

Here is the image of the draft I used.  I was using WeavePoint at the time, and I can now no longer open the draft file.

I will post it here for someone who has WeavePoint, perhaps you can turn it into a .WIF file for me.

The source of my profile was the Jacob Angstadt Designs – Figure 164

My current weaving software is WeaveMaker. I am using a MAC system.

Interweave Store

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Double Bow Knot Coverlet

Woven sample of Double Bow KnotAn old pattern in overshot weaving that has had many names over time: Muscadine Hills, Hickory Leaf, Blooming Leaf.  The Double Bow Knot name comes from the leaf like square  that forms the larger portion of the design. The dark square is called a table. Because there are two motifs used the pattern it may be most properly described as a Double Bow Knot and table design.

This design can be woven with only four shafts in an overshot structure. Overshot blocks can share shafts, which is what makes them so efficient. It is a structure that will require you to have planned your design carefully before you thread your loom. The threading typically is the most limiting design factor. coverlet - francis goodrich with coverlet

The goal of traditional overshot weaving is to be able to “square” the blocks as they are woven from the lower right hand corner of the loom to the left most block, which will result in the leaf or bow portions being square also. The coverlet in the photo on the right was not a perfect square and did not “match” when sewn together. This could be from the choice of threads for pattern and weft, and it may also have been impacted by how tightly it was beaten when woven.

DoubleBowknot_Pattern - old drafting methodEarly copies of drafts for this coverlet were written with a different notation than weavers use today. Draft of Pattern from Edward Francis Worst The only threads listed were pattern threads. Weavers were expected to  know where the plain weave threads were to be placed. The draft to the right is a modern version of the draft on the left. All of the needed threads are shown for the pattern. It is read from right to left and top to bottom. What it does not tell you is anything about the needed tie-up or the treadling.

Not to despair, these early weavers knew some basic weaving information that may not be apparent to weavers today. If you look closely that the draft above on the right, every other thread appears on either the first or second shaft, this is our clue as to where the plain weave background will come from. The first treadle will need to be tied to shafts 1 and 2 and the second treadle will be tied to shafts 3 and 4. When you alternate these using treadles you will achieve a plain “tabby” weave. When translating a historic pattern I suggest simplifying it into a profile draft to demonstrate the order and number of blocks that must be threaded on the loom.  When you do this you can now use any block structure you would like.double bow knot profile draft This design can be woven using any loom that can support 4 blocks of the desired structure. This pattern in overshot will require 744 threads. If sett at 24 threads per inch a single repeat will be  31 inches wide when woven. In the photo of the full coverlet above the coverlet was woven with 2 and 1/2 repeats in each piece. The documentation for the coverlet indicates it was sett at 40 ends per inch (epi). It would have likely to have been woven on a 60″ wide loom.

This profile could be woven as:

  • Overshot or Crackle on a 4 shaft loom
  • Spot Bronson, Bronson Lace, Huck Lace, Summer and Winter, Even Tied Overshot, Half-satin, or Bergman,  on an 8 shaft loom
  • Turned Twill, Patterned Double Weave, or Beiderwand, or Twill Lampas on a 16 shaft loom
  • Damask will require 20 shafts.

There are a ton of possibilities based on your choice of profile and structure,  we haven’t even begun to talk color, or choice of materials.

Because of the large size of the profile draft, it is not expected that the coverlet will require a border. The table portion of the design can function as a border if it is placed on both sides of the warp.
Primary Weaving Resources:

  • The Shuttle-Craft Book of American Hand-Weaving  Open Page 182
  • Foot-power Loom Weaving  Open Pages 96-97
  • The Book of Handwoven Coverlets  Open Pages 22-23
  • Of Coverlets: the Legacies, the Weavers  Open Pages 347-352

Additional Weaving Resources: (Use Resources search page for a complete listing)

    • A Basic Approach to Designing and Drafting Original Overshot Patterns  Open
    • American and European Handweaving Revised  Open
    • An Introduction to Turned Overshot  Open
    • Contemporary Approach to Traditional Weaves: Overshot and Summer and Winter  Open
    • Creative Overshot  Open
    • Creative Overshot  Open
    • Foot-power Loom Weaving  Open
    • Functional Overshot: Basic Source for Modern Fabric Design  Open
    • Handwoven Overshot Figures on 8 Harnesses  Open
    • Master Weaver Library, Vol. 7: Contemporary Approach to Traditional Weaves: Overshot and Summer & Winter  Open

Drafting Files for Download:

WIF File Download File - Profile Draft Only

Download a Profile Draft to use in your weaving software

WIF Files Download File

Download the FULL Weaving Draft to use in your weaving software.

Zip File Download File - No Software

Download a Zipped (Compressed) file with the Full Draft images of threading, treadling, and tie-up. Does not require you to have weaving software.

Project File Download File

Download a Double Bow Knot Shawl Project. Package includes both a PDF file with a complete weaving draft and a WIF for use in weaving software.

New Features

Nominate a Weaver

Do you know a weaver that could use some recognition from the weaving community? You can submit their name to Historic Weaving to be included on the Featured Weavers Page. Submit Here.

Handwovens for Sale

Are you a weaver that is looking for new places to market your handwovens? You can submit a FREE link to your website, gallery site, Pinterest or ETSY listing to be included on the Handwovens for Sale page. Submit Here.

Submit a Sample

Have you used a draft featured on Historic Weaving to weave a textile? Submit a sample image of your finished cloth (a link to a picture) and I will associate it with the draft on Historic Weaving. Our mission is to create a sample book for all of us to enjoy. Submit Sample Here.

Rigid Heddle Band Weaving

latvian woven bandBeautiful bands with a thousand uses. Many cultures weave bands but few weave them with the style of Scandinavia and Latvia. The materials needed to weave these bands are simple and readily obtainable. double rigid heddleThere are groups dedicated to this type of weaving. The Braid Society in Europe and TWIST in the United States.

On the society websites you can find galleries of woven bands and instructions on how to get started weaving in this tradition. I also found a course being offered by the North House Folk School in Minnesota in May of 2013 that you may be interested in taking if you are in the area.

While the bands are traditionally woven on backstrap  looms they also can be reproduced on a standard loom if you happen to have one handy. sash upper The image on the left is  a Latvian design that I wove in a wide band on my AVL loom. The most important consideration  to remember is that a pattern thread is twice the thickness of the ground thread. A traditional belt, band or sash is often woven using wool. My experiment was woven in cotton.

I have also been able to weave this style of band on my Morgan loom without using a rigid heddle or tablet cards.

smDSCF2358

I was able to make use of red and white beads to identify pattern threads and modified my draft to make weaving easier for me.

DSCF2477DSCF2461

 

 

 

Here is a copy of the draft that I made for weaving the belt.

BELT1.xlsx

Books:samibandweavingcover

 

 

Video Tutorials:

Weaving Library

double etoffe à navette copierThe Weaving Library website is a European version of the Handweaving.net  for silk and dobby weaving. If you are into looking at antique and modern silk weaving and  learning about textile analysis which included photos of swatches of the weaving drafts, this is the place. A good percentage of the material is presented in French and will required knowledge of european drafting methods, but there are areas in which you can find English translations. The site appears to serve historians, and commercial weavers alike.  The site offers some PDF files of original texts for download many of these are in French. My primary interest in the site is to continue to get inspiration for historic drawloom weaving.

Favorite Scandinavian Projects to Weave: 45 Stylish Designs for the Modern Home

I went to the local library a week ago and I found this little treasure. Because I have a Glimakra drawloom I was very IMG_2846interested in this book. Hints and tips from the writers of VAV Magazine are ALWAYS welcome. Was I delighted when I opened IMG_2838the cover to browse through the pictures. None of the projects are overly complicated. And some of the treasures include how to weave a hammock,  make european style linen towels with the woven loops, and a striking striped summer “light” blanket. While the threads are not ‘translated’ it will be easy enough to make use of of Handwoven’s thread guide to find our American equivalents.IMG_2841

I am most interested in the hammock project as I have always wanted to make one for my house.  I can’t wait for a sunny day and a glass of lemonade and my sunglasses!

Favorite Scandinavian Projects to Weave

Author / Editor: Ignell, Tina    Publishing Location:   Publication Date: 2008

Publisher: Trafalgar Square  Pages: 128p

Periodical Title:   Volume:   Issue:

Description of Contents:

Creating handwoven textiles for the home is a time-honored tradition and one any crafter can enjoy. If you wish to truly tailor your home decor, let this book lead the way. It features : 45 unique projects developed and tested by professional weavers — Step-by-step instructions, charts, illustrations, and color photos — Work with linen, half-linen, cottolin, wool, paper, and piassava — Versatile ideas for pillows, throws, rugs, curtains, table linens, and more — A special section on textile care and handling.

To Purchase: To View:

Access to WorldCat

Find out more - what people made, and how they did it

Weaving Courses - tutorials, videos, instructions

Project Material Catalog

Inkle Weaving

One of the most important books on handweaving by Mary Meigs Atwater. In it you will learn the basics of inkle and tablet weaving.

Byways in Hand-Weaving

Author / Editor: Atwater, Mary Meigs    Publishing Location:   Publication Date: 1954 and 1988

Publisher: Shuttle-Craft Books  Pages: 128

Periodical Title:   Volume:   Issue:

Description of Contents:

Traditional patterns from around the world for small or off-loom weaving. This book, which has been used extensively as a reference for some obscure techniques includes information on equipment and materials, as well as drafts and designs for card, inkle, and a variety of belt loom weaves. Twining, including Maori and Persian, and braiding and knotting techniques from India, Egypt, China, Peru, the Philippines, and some Neolithic times are included. There are card-weaving patterns and techniques from Egypt, Finland, and Armenia. Included with “inkle” weaves are those from Europe, as well as some Navajo and Mexican weaves, and those from Central and South America. Estonian and Peruvian bag weaves are compared. Other little-known weaves included are that for an African girdle found in the Atlas Mountains, a Scandinavian warp-faced weave, and some Egyptian warp-faced weaves, including the draft for the so-called “Girdle of Rameses”.

To Purchase: To View:

Access to WorldCat

Find out more - what people made, and how they did it

Weaving Courses - tutorials, videos, instructions

Project Material Catalog