I am certified!

I have officially completed the Montana Artrepreneur Program.

What does that mean? I have studied, sweated and worked diligently to refine my work, as well as to learn to tell my story and build a sustainable business brand as a weaver and an artist.

I have learned how to dedicate time to both the studio and the business; achieving goals, executing marketing plans and business plans while I am creating new work to sell to the public.

When you ask me for a business card, artist statement, resume, press kit, portfolio or a formal proposal, I can deliver electronically and in print.

If I bring you work to sell, you’ll get a record of the inventory, with product images for easy identification. I understand and can explain my price points if needed.  I know how to produce and sell work at wholesale rates to retailers.

Doing business with me will be a pleasure!

 

 

 

 

 

Weave with me.

Our weaving together is important for many reasons. I get to learn about you and encourage you on your life journey and your weaving with me provides me with joy and a sense of community.

Weaving is my happy place. When the world does not work as expected, I can pick up some thread, wind a warp and create a loom-bound universe of my very own to spend some quality time in. The reality is that my output may not be perfect, but I always feel better for having spent the time on the loom. I always learn something, and get new ideas on how to improve my work the next time.

Weaving teaches me several things, as much as I would like order and control, the universe has other plans. I must be careful as I reasonably can in planning, warping, and the weaving to ensure good results. I have to be willing to own my mistakes/missteps and determine for myself what must change in order to improve. Progress may be slow at times but it is not a race to the finish line to say “done, and done”. I have my lifetime to enjoy this, there really is no hurry or timeline to meet except one I create for myself.

My call to action is “Weave with me.” It is an invitation to come alongside and share the joy of just “being” and sharing a common love of fiber art. I have no expectation that you will want to weave what I weave, your life and your weaving needs are not mine. There will be days that you want more information and knowledge, and there will be days when you just want companionable company for the journey. Whether you bring a loom and a project with you for our session or you make use of the looms and projects in my rolling studio, rest assured we will pass our time together pleasantly.

Interweave Store

I purchased a motorhome in order to make it easier to meet you. My plan is to be able to travel to you, I love seeing new places and new people. I also no longer feel the need to move at the speed of sound. On the road, I can slow down a little and spend more time with people. The usual teaching experience for a weaving teacher is a morning workshop or a long weekend pouring out knowledge and technique as fast as one can speak. I know that weaving takes time, and so does learning a new skill. My preference would be for spending a week or two in an area before moving on, time to see where and how you live, make new friends and finish a project of my own. If this sounds good to you or your guild, I invite you to: “Weave with me.” Drop me an email via the contact page and let me know how I can come alongside and enrich you and your guild’s weaving experience.

Let’s spend some quality time weaving together.

 

Click here to view standard rates for 2018

 

The six dollar loom – Introduction to Weaving Project

Six Dollar Loom

Have you wondered how you could construct enough DIY looms that were affordable for a group students to use?

I have the answer for you, try my six dollar loom. It can be constructed out of parts found at a local hardware store and does not require fancy tools to assemble. It is adjustable, transportable and able to be disassembled flat for storage.

I designed this loom this year for a weaving class at the local library, I was able to produce 20 units for $120 in parts. The hardware parts are also available in bulk from McMaster-Carr allowing you to save even more money if you happen to need even more.

It is as sturdy as a Hockett loom, it is also flexible in that you can easily modify the sett for weaving. My instructions include suggestions for the threads to be used for your very first project.

I will be using this loom design to develop more weaving lessons to be used in the classroom.

The first project is a bookmark, that is expected to take 30-60 minutes to weave in a classroom of new weavers.

 

To purchase your plans click on this link:

http://historicweaving.com/wordpress/products-page/looms/the-six-dollar-loom-introduction-to-weaving-project

 

Your purchase helps to fund the cost of hosting these plans and helps to keep weaving accessible to the next generation of weavers.

 

 

Jennifer’s Draft Number #2

Jennifer wrote to me and asked me about this draft she had found in a file. She was not familiar with this particular draft and wanted to learn more about it. My first step was to look at the blocks – the areas separated by the long lines. Most of the sections have 4 lines in them in two rows. It appears that this draft is on four shafts. Likely it is an overshot draft.

I looked at the sequence of the blocks, reading from the right to the left,  A block has lines on shaft 2 and shaft 4, B block has lines on shaft 2 and 3, C block has lines on shaft 1 and 3, D block has lines on shaft 1 and shaft 4. Looking through the rest of the draft the are no other combinations of lines. Our Draft has 4 blocks. I then could label the blocks on a piece of paper

I then wrote the draft out in my notebook, matching the lines and the threads by the block I identified.

I then translated this into a profile draft by substituting  the A Block for shaft 1, the B Block for shaft 2, the C Block for Shaft 3 and the D Block for shaft 4. Because some of the blocks had 4 threads and some only 2. I decided to use two threads to represent the four thread blocks, and one thread for the half block. I treated the 3 thread block as a two thread block for the profile.

I set the tie up to ABCD, to match the blocks.

I then selected tromp as writ, and colored the warp a contrasting color to make the design appear.

While I was entering the draft into the iWeaveit program, I noticed that some of the draft was not even (balanced) I adjusted the draft to make it even.

I had found one place where the draft did not move sequentially through the blocks. Usually overshot moves in a circular fashion through the blocks, jumping blocks can cause long floats to appear. You can see the area on the on the bottom line towards the left edge the block moved from D to B and back to D again. This is in one of the short blocks. This is not the way the other side of the block is, and so I adjusted it to match the beginning of the block sequence.

At this point you can not weave the pattern, but you have a fairly good idea of what the design will look like when woven.

The blocks in the threading move gracefully from left to right and the designed when woven will have that characteristic of a 45 degree diagonal line from bottom right to top left.

When this design is woven it will need to have a border and a number of repeats to match the size of the fabric desired. To repeat the design you would start from the top right of the threading and enter that sequence after the last thread on shaft 4 in the draft.

At this point, you are missing the threads for the ground cloth. The tabby weave.

To weave this pattern I will need to decide what structure it is, and then change the draft to have that threading arrangement.  I will show you how I do this in the next blog update.

 

This is a quick look at the profile draft as it is repeated.

There are tables (the big blocks) and smaller blocks in the middle. The pattern will look like the checkerboard you see, to prevent long floats.

I am sure this pattern can have variations. This is a sample of what it would look like if it remained symmetrical.