2019 Christmas Tree

2019 Christmas Tree

It is Christmas time again. I have been able to get back to the drawloom this winter and I designed and wove a new Christmas Tree using the rules for Opphamta.  My original inspiration was a counted cross stitch design that I saw on Pinterest. The design as I first saw it was not suitable for weaving in Opphamta. I made the necessary modifications and discovered that it can be woven on a drawloom that has 41 blocks. This can be accomplished with either a single unit drawloom, or a 50 shaft drawloom. The pattern can be modified to be woven on looms with less than 40 blocks by eliminating the rows from the bottom of the tree.

If you are interested in purchasing the original piece that I wove on the drawloom, please contact me via email, or PM me on facebook.

If you are more interested in weaving your own tree. I have posted the *.wif file for the draft in my shop: https://historicweaving.com/wordpress/products-page/weaving_drafts_computer/2019-christmas-tree/  it is a $3 download.

 

Changes

Weave with me workshop

Weave with me workshop

2019 has been a very interesting year. I had reconstructive surgery on my ankle in February and have been under going physical therapy to improve my ability to use the ankle most of this year. I have recently completed my full time work with Oracle and now find myself able to devote more of my time and energy to my weaving and Fine Art studio practices. I have begun offering introductory hand weaving workshops through the adult education programs in Bozeman and Ennis. I expect to continue this opportunity in 2020.

I now offer individual and small group instruction at my studio as well.  A fee of $55 per student will cover loom access, materials and 6 hours of instruction. Workshops run from 10 am until 4 pm with a lunch break. Maximum workshop size is 4 participants, this arrangement allows for one on one attention. Participants will be using modern table looms and professional weaving techniques. See my workshop proposal page for workshop topics and course details.

2020 is year planned for professional creative growth, both in my capacity to bring weaving workshops to the public and my private studio practice on the drawloom. I intend to be busy at my large looms a good portion of my week. I will be both designing and weaving new pieces to share with you. I hope that you will continue to join my on my journey through time as an historical weaver.

 

 

 

 

 

The Mournin’ Max Weaver’s Challenge toolkit has arrived.

"Mournin Max"

There are four parts of the “Mournin’ Max” Weaver’s Challenge toolkit.

1. The “Mournin’ Max” – Celebrating 100 years of distance learning in hand weaving. An e-book to telling the story of how and why this project came to be. This book also contains my process notes for the design and weaving of the sampler.

2. The “Mournin’ Max” Weaving Challenge Card Deck – A deck of 108 cards that can support up to 6 weavers undertaking the challenge at the same time. The cards are used to determine the colors and patterns that will need to be woven to complete the challenge. The deck has been configured to require weavers to draft the treadling sequences needed to weave the designs. This deck will need to be ordered via this link: https://makeplayingcards.com/sell/historicweaving (link is live)

3. The “Mournin’ Max” – Sample Draft Package. 78 Draft files with nearly 100 drafts in both Treadle and Lift Plan formats. Files are .wif so they will work in most weaving software packages. These file contain the answers for the bonus draft cards in the “Mournin’ Max” Weaving Challenge Card Deck.

4. The “Mournin’ Max” – Draft Solutions e-book. A 36 page row by row solution guide to the drafting of each of the original 23 sampler rows. Each individual weaver participating in the challenge will need access to this book. It can be used as an introduction to the project, and confirmation that the solution the participant provided matches the original design before weaving the rows into the sampler. This book contains the rules and instructions for setup up of the challenge, the materials needed and loom warping instructions, as well as a hyperlinked introductory weavers glossary and a first lesson in draft reading and development.

The “Mournin’ Max” Weaving challenge can be completed by an individual or as a guild study group or full day workshop.

This is a workshop that I can present with my mobile studio for up to four weavers. The looms will arrive dressed for the challenge and all materials will be included in the workshop fee.

“Mournin’ Max” Sneak Preview

"Mournin Max"

“Mournin’ Max” – by Elizabeth Tritthart

Coming shortly to this website’s store:

The story behind the weaving of “Mournin’ Max”, my summer research and my learning while on the road with my loom.

A collection of the “Mournin’ Max” project overshot drafts for both 4 shaft and 8 shaft looms based on the work of Mary Meigs Atwater. Draft package will be available in .wif files for weavers with weaving software, and pdf format for those that do not have weaving software.

A “Mournin’ Max” Weaving Challenge 108 card deck, and a companion Draft Solutions book. Perfect for a full day guild weave-along or workshop. Designed to introduce weavers to the concept of building a draft from looking at a textile.

Who was Max anyway, and why would someone mourn him?

Mourning Max Sneak Preview

“Mournin’ Max” the story behind the weaving

Draft Solutions Book Cover

Draft Solutions Book Cover

Sample Draft Solution Page

Sample Draft Solution Page

Mournin' Max Weaving Challenge Card Deck

“Mournin’ Max” Weaving Challenge Example

Detail of "Mournin' Max"

Detail of “Mournin’ Max”

Fall Workshops

Historic Weaving Mobile Studio Set up

Historic Weaving’s Mobile Studio Setup

Last weekend was my first Continuing Education Weaving Workshop in Ennis.  I met four new weavers and we had a wonderful time learning about weaving and these beautiful looms.  I can’t wait to see everyone again in my studio. It was a great experience preparing the lessons and the looms.  I have found that the studio packs well into my motor home, leaving me with plenty of space to rest at the end of a whirlwind day. Our one day “Let’s Get Started Weaving” Workshop was held from 10am until 4pm.

 

Historic Weaving's Classroom Setup

Historic Weaving’s Classroom Setup

Color Station

Historic Weaving Mobile Studio Color Station

Kudos to Go Daddy

Today was a big day in the IT of this domain, I installed the SSL certificate, upgraded my email service to Office 365 (even migrating my email on a MAC), consolidated my domain hosting, and added server malware scanning to the site to make it more secure. Lest you think I’m overly proficient, I did this work with the help of a Go Daddy guide. I am pleased with the outcome.

I’m hosted privately,  backed up,  secured and ready to move forward.

Stay tuned for a new product for weavers just in time for the Holiday season. Hint: (it involves the piece below)

Mournin’ Max – woven by Elizabeth Tritthart

Weave with me. Fall 2019 Workshop and Show Schedule

Access to hand weaving instruction doesn’t get better than this.

Below are some easy times and places to get you started exploring hand weaving this fall.

No experience or loom required, affordable workshop rates, offered through local Adult Education programs.

October 5th – Ennis – “Let’s Get Started Weaving” workshop.  10am -4pm. Reserve through the Ennis Adult Education Program

October 26-27th – Bozeman – Demonstration area in Bozeman Made Fair at the Brick Breeden Field House  – FREE

November 9th – Bozeman – “Let’s Get Started Weaving” workshop. Reserve through the Bozeman Adult Education Program

November 23rd – Bozeman – Demonstration area in Montana Parent Holiday Bazaar  at the GranTree Inn – FREE

200 Thread Challenge – My Inheritance Draft

Get the draft and project notes for the 200 Thread Challenge – My Inheritance

The entire project requires only 200 threads. Sett is 20 epi using a 10 dent reed using 10/2 cotton.

Pattern can be woven with equal ease on 4 shaft table loom or floor loom.

The challenge is designed to be worked using Mary Meigs Atwater’s “law of diagonals” for overshot weaving.

Full draft is included for the computer  with a downloadable .wif file

Also included in the download is the .PDF file for those that do not use weaving software. (Full draft)

Click here to purchase the My Inheritance 200 Thread Challenge Project.

Give the gift of weaving for Christmas this year.

Do you have a special someone who loves all things fiber? And you don’t know where to begin to get that unique gift that they will always remember? You can provide them with the ultimate fiber experience, weaving cloth on a loom with a professional weaver as your guide. Both individual and small group opportunities are available. We can meet in my studio, or I can come to you.

Don’t know if they would like to weave or purchase a gift from my studio? A gift certificate can do it all and there no size or colors to worry about.

A gift certificate can do it all, no size or colors to worry about. Click on the certificate amount below for easy purchase using Paypal for secure transactions. $50 Gift Certificate,  $100 Gift Certificate, $200 Gift Certificate

 

 

 

Weave with me newsletter – October 2018

Click here to open Weave with Me Newsletter for October 2018

 

Opportunities for learning about weaving, and weaving with me:

 

Open Studio November 3-4 10:30am -5pm Historic Weaving Studio

MT Parent 5th Annual Holiday Bazaar  November 24th 10am – 4pm at the Gran Tree Inn

Kids/Family Weaving Day: Santa’s Elves  December 8th, 9am -11am or 1pm-3pm

Bozeman Weaver’s Guild Meeting  Saturday, November 17th 11-1pm Bozeman Fire Station 3

Santa’s Workshop for Adults: December 1st, 6pm to 8pm  Historic Weaving Studio

 

 

The backstory on 50 Shades of Gray warp

While trolling around on Pinterest for inspiration, I came across this image. I found it attractive, and classic at the same time. Foolish me, I took note of the image, associated it with other Bauhaus artists that inspire me and got to work thinking about how I could translate this into a woven piece suitable for one of my traveling handlooms. For the next two weeks. I could not make that image come into my feed again.

Little did I know what I had stumbled upon. This was a work of one of the big artists in my era – Sol LeWitt, he was based in New York City , my childhood cultural mecca during the 1960’s and 1970’s. Mom brought us children to the city at least monthly for cultural events, music, art, etc. I grew up thinking everyone went to the Met, MoMA, Carnegie Hall and Radio City Music Hall on a regular basis. It’s what you do when school’s out or on a weekend; take a train, walk the city, come home excited but exhausted.

Turns out Mr. LeWitt and I might have crossed paths as Wikipedia says of him that:

He had an entry-level job as a night receptionist and clerk he took in 1960 at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York.

Paragraphs on Conceptual Art LeWitt asserted that Conceptual Art was neither mathematical nor intellectual but intuitive, given that the complexity inherent to transforming an idea into a work of art was fraught with contingencies.[43] LeWitt’s art is not about the singular hand of the artist; it is the idea behind each work that surpass the work itself.

Also come to find out he was also influenced by Josef Albers, a Bauhaus alumni:

Sol LeWitt: Wall Drawing

Seven Basic Colours and all their Combinations in a Square Within a Square

Sol LeWitt dedicated his wall drawing to Josef Albers, whose colour theory and practice was a significant influence on his own development.

Even if LeWitt and Albers are separated by a fundamentally different understanding of their work, what is valid for both artists is their avoidance of any emphatic idea of authorship, their surmounting of any hierarchic model of composition and the way they, in general, objectify the work concept in which a single piece is always part of a long term serial study.

I saw this piece, and instantly set about figuring how a warp like this could be created. I drew a simple draft.

Note, my draft is backwards as the orientation of the work was not most critical in my mind, but the mechanics behind the pattern was. Sol LeWitt increased the black lines by 1 in every block and began his work with a minimum of two blocks. The grid used, was very similar to the one he used for his cubes. Which explains the two black lines around the outside.

From there I decided to build on this pattern principle, I wanted a draft with 200 threads, 10 blocks of 20 threads each and I was home free! Next step was to wind this warp, each set of blocks would require a different number of threads in black and white.

I fashioned my own sectional warping system from a reel that was donated to me by a weaving friend. I used a velvet cantra frame to hold the AVL tension box, and a LeClerc spool rack for the 30 bobbins needed.

Yes, I am an engineer and I think of these types of things often.

I then transferred the warp from the reel to the Ashford Katie loom I was going to weave it on.

I threaded the 8 shafts in a straight threading keeping my options open for structure changes.

The reed in the loom is a 10 dpi read and I sleyed it at two threads per dent. Warp was composed of 10/2 cotton in black and white. One of the first things that I noticed, if the sleying/threading was not correct, all of the black threads would not rise to the top at the same time. This was a clue to go back and double check my work. I found the warp quick to proof in this way.

My first sample was woven in a plain weave with a sett of 20 ends per inch,  half the threads up on each throw of the shuttle. It was easy to start with the white on the left and know which lever to throw with each pass, until you began to add the black. Then I needed to check what the last throw was to determine the next. In my zeal to finish the sample, Ihad abandoned the draft, and resorted to looking and counting. In some ways it was slow going, the piece took about 4 hours to weave only because I made mistakes and had to undo and redo my work. What did I gain from this approach, more of a reliance on what my eyes saw in the cloth versus what the draft said to do. Some of the first steps in design on the loom.

From the photo of the loom you can see I wove this piece outside while camping.

What troubled me about the piece was that it was not square, each block was taller than long, the sett was quite loose for the thread. The loom is only 12 inches wide, lowering the sett was not a practical solution for this loom.

For the second sample I chose to switch to a twill structure which allowed the threads to collapse down on each other a bit more. I measured the block and I was very close to square, I felt it was close enough to continue.

During this weaving I made note that if I was not careful with the levers, and picked a 2&7 combination instead of 2&5, I began to see a log cabin or shadow weave variation appear in the warp. Twice, I needed to unweave large sections of the warp to remove this undesirable optical effect.

Here are the two finished samples side by side:

There was much more I want to weave and try on this warp. But time is short, and I will have to leave it to some of my students to complete.

I am pleased that Sol LeWitt’s work translated so well into weaving. It provides a great study for practicing design principles while on the loom.

I can now see the difference the structure will make in both the range of values, and the size of the pixel.

 

Click here to purchase draft package of the 50 Shades of Grey Challenge. Package includes computerized draft for weaving software .wif file, and non-computerized draft in PDF format, as well as a PDF with pictures detailing the project.

 

 

Testing of the “50 Shades of Grey” warp

I was first inspired by a pen in and ink drawing I saw on Pinterest but in my excitement, I did not capture it and now I can’t get it back in my feed to credit it properly. It was a museum piece from the Bauhaus era, which is why it spoke to me.

I decided to see if I could weave it on a loom, specifically on a 4 or 8 shaft loom.

Turns out it was very possible. I did the sample twice on the warp you see here, once in plain weave and again using a straight twill. The twill I think most closely matches the look I was going for.

There are many more experiments to try. Clasped weft (black and white), color substitution in weft, Solid color in weft. It goes on and on, and no two will be alike.

 

Historic Weaving is participating in Bozeman OPEN Studios Tour

You will want to save the date for this event. Historic Weaving is opening its doors to the touring public on November 3 & 4, 2018

Learn how art is made first hand by visiting local artists studios.

In my, case I will have a studio full of looms ready for you to try your hand at weaving for the first time. Be certain to allow enough time to sit for a few minutes and learn to throw a shuttle. Its not very complicated, at least for the projects I have prepared for you.

I will also be serving fine finger foods to stave off those cravings you get while roaming the countryside in search of great artists and their art.

Of course, you will have the opportunity to purchase handwoven gifts, just in time for the gift giving season.

Website: https://bozemanopenstudios.weebly.com/

I look forward to seeing you and having you weave with me.

 

Introducing the 200 Thread Challenge for Fall 2018

 

 

 

 

 

When I teach others, I am focused on the skills students want to acquire to meet their immediate weaving needs. For example, you have never woven before and you want to get started. I have a plan for that. I’ll bring you a loom to use that is completely set up, and we will sit down together, meet the loom and begin to weave. No big preamble to get started, just the basics, and the wonder of weaving for the first time. There is plenty of time to get into the grit of warping, designing and drafting later. For your first experience, I am looking to create a supportive environment in which you are ensured success.

As a weaving teacher/coach, I can come to your home, or meet a public location that works for both of us. We predetermine the amount of time for the session, and perhaps the project you are most interested in completing.

I am introducing my new 200 Thread Challenge Series of projects for the fall of 2018.

This is a series of 4 warps, equally suitable for both new weavers and those with experience.

1. “50 Shades of Grey” Using only black and white warp and plain weave, can you create 50 different shades? What techniques will you use to control the outcome? New weavers may want to explore the impact of unexpected color in a black and white warp. At the end of the session you will have a lovely wall hanging to remind you of your weaving session.

 

 

 

 

2. “What Moves You?” You are presented with a random color warp, how will you weave it? Are you most concerned about color, symmetry, structure or texture? You will be presented with a choice of weft yarns to complete your project. What you decide will help you to understand more about what is important in your weaving experience.

 

 

 

 

3. “The Inheritance” A warped loom arrives,  there are no drafts, and no one to help you, it is just you and the loom? Can you discover how to weave the correct pattern? Do you want to? This exercise will help experienced weavers  see how you will cope with the unknown. New weavers will be given hints to ensure success.

 

 

 

4. “Earn your Stripes” How will you create stripes on a single color warp? Will you use color or structure, or a combination of both. Do you like french linen, plaids or some other combination?

 

 

 

 

 

For small groups, I can bring all of four of my table/floor looms with the projects on them. When we meet, I will help you decide who gets to complete which challenge while we have a good time getting to know one another.  If you are scheduling a two hour session, I will provide snacks and light beverages (water, tea, coffee) as part of the class fee.  In the Bozeman area,  the all inclusive cost is $100 per person weaving.   For that fee, I warp the loom, provide the weft materials, and facilitate a morning or afternoon of weaving fun.

If you are located outside of the Bozeman/Belgrade area and want to schedule a 200 Thread Challenge session for you, your family, or your guild, please contact me (fill out the form below – in the comment please mention the 200 Thread Challenge) and we can discuss if a mileage fee will be needed to cover transportation costs to your location.  For Rates and Options – see Rate Sheet.

Contact me: